Sapphire Pavilion by David E. Grogan

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David Grogan served on active duty in the post-Vietnam-War United States Navy for more than twenty-six years as a Navy Judge Advocate. He’s now retired, but his experiences in prosecuting and defending court-martial cases around the world inform and enrich his writing of legal thrillers, the first of which was The Siegel Dispositions.

That book introduced Grogan’s main character, ex-JAG Corps officer Steve Stilwell. The Sapphire Pavilion (Camel Press, 280 pp., $15.95, paper; $4.99, Kindle), another mystery thriller, involves Stilwell fighting to get justice for his old buddy, Ric Stokes, who is incarcerated for possessing heroin in Vietnam. Stokes was sharing a hotel room with Ryan Eversall, now dead of an overdose while with a prostitute, herself now among the missing.

Stilwell is convinced this is a frame-up and travels to Saigon to get to the bottom of the affair.  The bad guys who set up his friend immediately go after Stilwell. There’s a file involved in this thriller labelled “The Sapphire Pavilion,” a catchy and convenient title for this book.

The villains underestimate Stilwell, who refuses to roll over and play dead. Helping him fight these forces of evil is a plucky and lovely female former Army pilot, Casey, who has one leg—a beautiful one—due to injury in a helicopter accident.

Stilwell gets through all of this derring-do in one piece, but it seems possible that Casey could lose her other leg. I won’t give that plot point away. It also looks as though our hero, Steve, might lose his wife, who has had it with his globe-trotting and consorting with beautiful female spies.

David Grogan

The case file for Sapphire Pavilion looks as though it will be one of Alfred Hitchcock’s McGuffins, but it works well enough to carry the book’s plot along until the exciting end.

If you enjoyed the previous book in this series, you’ll love this one, too.  Read and enjoy.

The author’s website is davidegrogan.com

—David Willson

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Red Stick Two by Kenneth Kirkeby

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U.S. Marine Corps veteran Kenneth Kirkeby’s novel, Red Stick One, received got a ton of positive reviews, including one from this reviewer. So I was eager to read a second Red Stick novel, Red Stick Two (Sharp Printing, 307 pp., $15.95, paper; $2.99, Kindle). I was not disappointed, and wound up agreeing with cover blurb from Kirkus Reviews: “Kirkeby’s talent for riveting suspense shifts into high gear.”

Red Stick Two is set twelve years after Red Stick One. The main character, Virgil Clary, has settled down on his Wyoming ranch with his wife Michelle and their two children. He’s been struggling to make a go of it, so when a lucrative offer comes his way from his former intelligence chief, Virgil is ripe to accept. He’ll also be serving his country.  That’s a plus for Virgil, a true-blue patriot.

There are risks involved. He must venture to South America, to Peru, a country on the brink of civil war, where he and his partner, Agent Richard Creole, will have to rescue a kidnapped American engineer held captive by a group of violent Maoists. Do I need to warn you that things might not go smoothly?

In fact, things go very wrong, as they often do in international political thrillers, and the action shifts into high gear. Red Stick Two more than held my attention, with both the nonstop action and the raft of details that kept my mind full engaged.

Virgil is a warm, engaging character who has been away from the game for many years, but who has stayed in shape by being a hands-on rancher at a high altitude, a big help in mountainous Peru. Readers will root for Virgil and their suspension of disbelief will not be too seriously tested.

I’m already eager for the next novel in the Red Stick series. Bring it on!

—David Willson

Some Never Forget by R. Cyril West

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Some Never Forget (Molan Labe, 302 pp., $12.95, paper; $.99, Kindle) is the second book in R. Cyril West’s POW/MIA Truth series. His first was The Thin Wall.

Some Never Forget is an intriguing mix of conspiracy theory related to the betrayal of POWs being left behind in Southeast Asia by their government, along with American Indian Tlingit mythology. The latter is an attempt to reap the sort of magic that Tony Hillerman made his own and nobody else has been able to hold a candle to.

West believes there are baskets full of dirty government secrets. It’s hard to argue with that. He begins the story begins in Sitka, Alaska, in 1980, nine years after Walter Greene’s son went missing in the Vietnam War. Greene is tormented about the unknown fate that befell his boy—especially after the Department of Defense suddenly changes his son’s status from MIA to KIA.

Greene sees this clerical change as redolent of meaning. After he gets a warning from a government functionary and weird things start happening on his homestead, Greene is galvanized into action.

He believes it is a lie that all the POWs came home. He wants to get to the bottom of things. We are assured that the end of the novel will make us gasp. It sort of does.

The first page of this paranoia thriller gives us the phrases “Korea Veteran,” “Don’t Tread on Me,” and “Fuck Hanoi Jane.” When I read the third, which is lettered on Greene’s leather jacket, I thought I knew all I needed to know about his mindset. I was pretty much right.

I guess I am in the “anti-American” crowd that Greene wishes to steer clear of.  I hope I am wrong.

The author’s web site is http://www.rcyrilwest.com/some-never-forget

—David Willson

The Cuban Affair by Nelson DeMille

Nelson DeMille is a veteran of the Vietnam War, having served as an Army infantry platoon leader with 1st Cavalry Division. He also is the author of twenty novels, most of which are action thrillers, and most of which have been big bestsellers.  He was named 2015 ThrillerMaster of the Year by the International Thriller Writers organization.

DeMille’s latest, The Cuban Affair (Simon & Schuster, 464 pp., $28.99, hardcover; $14.99, Kindle), more than lives up to those that preceded it. DeMille’s new hero is Daniel “Mac” MacCormick, a U. S. Army veteran who is using his hard-won military skills to run a fishing boat out of Key West. Mac spent five years as an Army infantry officer. He fought in Afghanistan, and was awarded a Silver Star and two Purple Hearts. That service also came with a variety of eye-catching scars, and it left him with a weakness for adventure.

A beautiful young Cuban-American woman offers Mac a deal in which he can help her retrieve $60 million in cash and gold left behind in Castro’s Cuba for a small cut. This isn’t the first novel of this sort I’ve read, so I suspected that things might go wrong. How could it not when the co-conspirators have a map showing where the gold is hidden?

Spoiler alert: Things do go a bit wrong. And even though a jaundiced Vietnam War veteran is part of Mac’s team, some unanticipated bad things happen. John Wayne gets a mention—not in a good way—and well-worn expressions from the Vietnam War such as “Di Di Mau” pop up.

Nelson DeMille

The murder of seventeen American Vietnam War POWs who had been held captive in the Hanoi Hilton also figures in the plot. They ended up in Cuba only to be tortured and shot by the Castro regime in those bad old days. Their skulls were kept in a trunk, which Mac is responsible for returning to America.

I recommend this novel to all those who have been fans of DeMille’s thrillers for as many years as I have. Also to those who have somehow not intersected with this master thriller writer.

You have hours of purely pleasurable reading ahead of you.

—David Willson

 

High Hand by Curtis J. James

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Curtis J. James is the pseudonym for three accomplished Washington, D.C.-area writers:  Curtis Harris, a cancer scientist; James Rosen, a political journalist; and James Ellenberger, a former AFL-CIO official. I’ve heard of two people writing a book, but three seems like maybe one too many.  I’d love to know how they coordinated their duties.

Ellenberger, a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America, served in Vietnam in 1968-69 with the 29th Civil Affairs Company in Da Nang, and has visited Vietnam three times since the war. His service in the war is enough to keep the committee that wrote the book honest, I’m sure.

High Hand (Copper Peak Press, $13.95, paper; $6.99, Kindle) is a political thriller with one of those fast-paced plots that can make your head dizzy if you are not careful. It’s a spy novel that the publisher compares to the work of Ian Fleming and John le Carre, both of whom I love, but neither is much like the other. Another blurb writer digs up Ken Follett and Tom Clancy as authors to compare to.

The plot centers around Frank Adams, who must figure out why his old poker buddies are being targeted for assassination. He’s so desperate for a solution to the puzzle that he enlists his ex-wife, Lisa Hawkes, for help.

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The authors

She is “a brilliant Russian linguist and a CIA covert agent.” Isn’t every ex-wife like that? I have got an ex-wife who was a children’s librarian.  That’s a very different skill set. Or maybe not.

I enjoyed this book, and it really is fast-paced, but not too fast paced. I didn’t fall asleep while reading it, but I did sleep well when I turned in. That’s a good thing.

Buy it and read it if you want to find out why the poker buddies are being killed. And if you wish to discover if three guys can sit down and write a book together that is worth reading.

My opinion: It’s worth your money.

The authors’ website is www.curtisjjames.com

—David Willson

The Mighty Jungle by John A. Bercaw

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John A. Bercaw served in the U. S. Army, as well as in the Marine Corps and the National Guard. He spent a year in South Vietnam as a helicopter pilot and his experiences form the background of The Mighty Jungle (CreateSpace, 154 pp., $8.75, paper; $2.99, Kindle). In addition to this thriller, Bercaw is the author of Pink Mist, a memoir of his tour of duty in Vietnam.

This novel has two main characters: a warrant officer pilot near the end of his time in the Vietnam War, and a young and very green infantry lieutenant. When their helicopter is shot down and crashes in the jungle, all the others are killed and these two characters are thrown together to attempt to evade capture and survive in that very hostile environment.

Bercaw is very graphic about what they encounter in the “mighty jungle.” Insects and other creepy crawlies the least of it. Spoiler warning: The green lieutenant does not make it. The warrant officer manages to barely survive capture (and torture) by the enemy, and ends up back in the safety of the U.S. Army. He is treated fairly and with compassion, which surprised me.

Dieter Dengler—the Navy pilot who was shot down, captured, and escaped his captivity in Laos—is cited. The Mighty Jungle has much of the flavor of Dengler’s classic book, Escape from Laos, and I was impressed that Bercaw had done his research so well.

This is an engrossing and exciting thriller and I very much enjoyed reading it. The song, “We Gotta Get Out of this Place,” is quoted and never has it been more appropriate. The extreme misery of being lost in a jungle has never been portrayed with more intensity and realism. I put the book down with gratitude that my tour of duty in Vietnam did not involve any such adventure or risk.

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Bercaw in country

The aspect of the novel that unnerved me the most was the worms. The two characters eat worms and also produce them from both ends of their bodies.

I figured that the worms would do them in. I was half right. The medical personnel who work on the survivor are much focused on the small creatures who inhabited his body.

Showers, soap, and poison soon bring them under control, but the psychic trauma is not so easily dealt with.  Time and the love of a good woman helped some.

There’s a lesson in that.

—David Willson

Melody Hill by Rick DeStefanis

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Rick DeStefanis served as a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne from 1970-72.  He brings his military experiences as a paratrooper and infantry light weapons specialist to every page of his novel, Melody Hill (CreateSpace, 364 pp., paper; Kindle), a prequel to his award-winning The Gomorrah Principle).

Duff Coleridge leaves behind Melody Hill, Tennessee, when he joins the Army and heads to Vietnam. While in country, he somehow manages to stumble into the shadow warrior realms and gets involved in black ops. A beautiful woman is, of course, involved. And naturally she is half French and speaks perfect English.

Does she really love Duff, or is she just using him to get information for her own devious purposes? Duff’s immediate boss seems to be as crooked and untrustworthy as possible, and Duff seems headed for an early grave in the jungles of South Vietnam.

Duff’s boss, codenamed Spartan, is dealing black market arms to the VC, and that is not even the worst of his sins. Duff, however, can’t get to the bottom of it all without placing himself at ultimate risk. Will he carry on, expose Spartan, and get the girl, or will he end up dead in a water-soaked ditch with a bullet in his head? You might be surprised at the answer.

If you read and enjoyed The Gomorrah Principle, this book will be right up your alley.  John Wayne gets two mentions, but Rick DeStafanis is much more interested in pop songs such as “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes,” “Sweet Dreams,” “Moon River,” and “Sea of Love” than in 1950s cowboy movie stars. Which is refreshing.

The author’s website is http://rickdestefanis.com/vietnam-war-novel-melody-hill

—David Willson